Inle Lae by Co Thiee

Inle Lake
by Co Thiee

To Market by Eain Aye Kyaw

To Market
by Eain Aye Kyaw

Ordinary People by Min Zaw

Ordinary People
by Min Zaw

Buddha's Face by Shine Lu

Buddha's Face
by Shine Lu

Home in the Hot Season by Shwe Thein

Home in the Hot Season
by Shwe Thein

Rakhine Sailboats by Shwe Thein

Rakhine Sailboats
by Shwe Thein

Night Market by Sue Htat Aung

Night Market
by Sue Htat Aung

Poetry to the Glory by Win Tint

Poetry to the Glory
by Win Tint

Saffron Uprising by Zwe Mon

Saffron Uprising
by Zwe Mon

Aung San Suu Kyi by Zwe Yan Naing

Aung San Suu Kyi
by Zwe Yan Naing

Inle Lake
by Co Thiee

2012
121 x 91 cm
Acrylic on canvas

Co Thiee was born in Yangon in 1963. As a student at Yangon University, he drew posters for the 8-8-88 democracy movement. In the 1990s he was employed as a signboard painter, illustrator, graphic designer and film director. He turned to painting in 2000, making it his professional career in 2006.

In this painting of Inle Lake in Shan State on the eastern side of Myanmar, he uses vivid colour to depict a community based entirely on water. For centuries, people have lived in stilt houses, been employed in stilt workshops, and grown produce in floating gardens. Today Inle Lake is a major tourist destination.
To Market
by Eain Aye Kyaw

2012
121 x 91 cm
Acrylic on canvas

Eain Aye Kyaw was born in Yangon in 1981. Inspired by a painter at the end of his street, he attended the State School of Fine Arts in Yangon from 2001 to 2004. After graduation, he worked as a commercial artist for the tourist trade, and as a housing broker. He became a full-time artist in 2010.

This picture of peasants heading to market on the back of a farm tractor is a stylized depiction of the rural life still lived by 70 percent of Myanmar's population. Already it is somewhat nostalgic, for as large-scale industrial farming, or agribusiness, spreads across the land, many of the old ways are fast disappearing.
Ordinary People
by Min Zaw

2013
91 x 121 cm
Acrylic on canvas

Min Zaw was born in Yangon in 1972. He attended the State School of Fine Arts in Yangon from 1991 to 1994, and the University of Culture, Yangon from 1994 to 1998. He won an ASEAN Art Award in 2002. He is one of five artists working collectively at Studio Square Gallery in Yangon.

In this painting of ordinary people, old and new are mixed together. The technique of first sketching the outlines of the figures and then filling in the colours is old. The T-shirts are new. The different colours in the stripes provide the only real differentiation among the boys.
Buddha’s Face
by Shine Lu

2013
121 x 91 cm
Acrylic on canvas

Shine Lu studied at the State School of Fine Arts in Yangon, and has been exhibiting paintings in Myanmar since 1987 and overseas since 2000. He was a finalist in the Asian Myanmar Art Awards in 2002 and 2004.

In this painting of the Buddha’s face, he draws on imagery from the dominant faith to which close to 90 percent of the Myanmar population subscribes.
Home in the Hot Season
by Shwe Thein

2013
120 x 91 cm
Acrylic on canvas

Shwe Thein was born in Kyauk Taw, Rakhine State in 1981. He attended the State School of Fine Arts in Yangon from 2001 to 2004. He has joined many group shows, and works as an artist in Yangon.

This painting of home in the hot season uses vibrant colour to convey the extreme heat, often rising above 40 degrees, experienced in parts of Myanmar in the months of February, March and early April before the monsoon rains come to signal the start of a new year.
Rakhine Sailboats
by Shwe Thein

2012
91 x 121 cm
Acrylic on canvas

Shwe Thein was born in Kyauk Taw, Rakhine State in 1981. He attended the State School of Fine Arts in Yangon from 2001 to 2004. He has joined many group shows, and works as an artist in Yangon.

This painting of Rakhine sailboats attests to the seafaring culture of Myanmar's western Rakhine State, a part of the country that was an independent kingdom until conquered first by Burma in 1785, and then by Britain in 1824. Today it remains something of a place apart, with a forceful local culture.
Night Market
by Sue Htat Aung

2012
121 x 91 cm
Acrylic on canvas

Sue Htat Aung was born in Yangon in 1965. He attended the State School of Fine Arts in Yangon from 1983 to 1986, and after graduation worked as a freelance comic magazine and book illustrator. His first solo show was in 2013. He now works mainly as an independent artist.

This painting faithfully presents Yangon street life as it is today, with people sitting on plastic stools at plastic tables to drink tea, have dinner and chat. The likelihood is that ten years from now scenes like this will have disappeared from most Yangon streets as rapid modernization reshapes the city.
Poetry to the Glory
by Win Tint

2013
91 x 121 cm
Acrylic on canvas

Win Tint was born in Pyinmana in 1966. He attended the State School of Fine Arts in Yangon from 1983 to 1986, and now teaches there. Since the mid-1980s, he has participated in local and international exhibitions. In 2004, he was the winner of the Myanmar Contemporary Art Awards.

This painting is of monks standing on the platform of Yangon's landmark Shwedagon Pagoda. The reflections in the painting are intended to trigger reflection in our minds.
Saffron Uprising
by Zwe Mon

2013
121 x 91 cm
Acrylic on canvas

Zwe Mon was born in Yangon in 1990. Encouraged by her father, a comic artist and illustrator, she attended the State School of Fine Arts in Yangon from 2006 to 2009. Since graduation, she has worked as a full-time artist.

This painting of the saffron uprising depicts the march of the monks in 2007. Partly they sought greater respect from an overbearing state. Partly they sought democracy. Their movement was crushed after several days of peaceful protest. Today, Buddhist monks are more likely to mobilize around a 969 movement promoting Bamar nationalism and xenophobia.
Aung San Suu Kyi
by Zwe Yan Naing

2012
119 x 90 cm
Collage

Zwe Yan Naing was born in Rakhine State in 1984. After living as a monk in Ngapali for nine years from the age of twelve, he moved to Yangon to attend the State School of Fine Arts from 2006 to 2009. Since graduation, he has worked as a full-time artist.

This collage of Aung San Suu Kyi, made of banknotes bearing her father's image, uses the iconography of posters from President Obama’s successful 2008 campaign to convey hope for Myanmar.